You Are What You Eat- A Nutritionist’s Guide To Radiant Skin

ADVERTISEMENT

We all want to love the skin we’re in, and it really is all about what we put into our bodies. So here is how to get the glow all year round.

What Do You Need More Of?

Water
Aim to drink a minimum of two liters of filtered water each day, to clean out the cells, and fill them with goodness.

Essential Fats
Consuming adequate amounts of good and essential fats—from oily fish, olive oil, avocados, nuts and seeds—helps to create strong cell membranes.

Organic fruit and vegetables
Antioxidants, found in colorful fruit and vegetables, help to neutralize the everyday stress that our skin is subjected to, and therefore prevents damage to the skin. Add some blueberries to your breakfast oatmeal, or throw some beetroot over your salad for lunch, and you’ll soon build up those antioxidants.

Fermented foods

Go with your gut. The health of your skin is linked to your gut. The correct level of good bacteria will support a clear, radiant complexion, while an imbalance of the bad bacteria can contribute to eczema and acne. The best way to boost your good bacteria is to eat a range of fermented foods. These include sauerkraut, kombucha, kefir and natural yoghurt.

Vitamin C
This is also an antioxidant, Vitamin C plays a very important role in the development of collagen, which keeps skin firm, and elastin, which keeps it supple and young looking. Introduce peppers, dark leafy greens and brussels sprouts to your diet.

What Should You Avoid?

Sugar
A high sugar intake can wreak havoc on skin, flaring  everything from acne to even contributing to aging skin. Pay attention to the hidden and/or unnecessary sugar in food: such as sweet drinks, packaged goods and ready meals. Make sure to check ingredients and look for hidden names such as modified corn starch, and ‘natural flavors’.

Alcohol
Alcohol is dehydrating and makes your your skin suffer. After alcohol drink a lot of water.

Caffeine
High levels of caffeine increase the stress hormone, cortisol. Cortisol raises another hormone, insulin—which can cause the skin to produce excess oil and turn over skin cells too quickly, leading to congestion. Try decaffeinated tea instead.

ADVERTISEMENT