Discovery At Monticello Plantation Sheds Light on Incredible Thomas Jefferson Mystery

A President’s Plantation

Thomas Jefferson’s iconic Monticello property in Virginia is a national landmark that scholars have long been studying. The plantation estate and the people who lived and worked there hold a significant place in the history of the nation. While there is a great amount of documentation about Jefferson’s primary home, archaeologists recently launched a new initiative to reveal more about the original activities on the grounds. It was amid those efforts that researchers made a discovery in that completely stunned historians. Read on to find out more about the groundbreaking find! Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, primarily resided at his Monticello plantation in Charlottesville, Virginia before he moved to the White House in 1801. Now regarded as a historical landmark, Jefferson began construction on Monticello (which mean “Little Mountain” in Italian) in 1768. The sprawling grounds have been well-studied, and an image of the plantation’s main house is even ingrained on the back side of the U.S. nickel. Despite great scrutiny of the estate over the years, a recent discovery on the property revealed details about a long-held mystery that utterly shocked historians. Thomas Jefferson was 26-years-old when he started building Monticello on land that he inherited from his father. The massive 5,000-acre plantation was primarily used to cultivate tobacco and wheat. But like many plantations of the time, Monticello has a controversial legacy linked to one of the dark parts of American history. The massive 5,000-acre plantation was primarily used to cultivate tobacco and wheat. But like many plantations of the time, Monticello has a controversial legacy linked to one of the dark parts of American history.

A President’s Plantation

Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, primarily lived at his Monticello plantation in Charlottesville, Virginia before he moved to the White House in 1801.

A President’s Plantation