The recently uncovered hidden story of Oxfordshire estate, Blenheim Palace

The recently uncovered hidden story of Oxfordshire estate, Blenheim Palace

In Oxfordshire, England,  Blenheim Palace stands tall and regal, the beautiful 18th-century estate, that houses a wealth of history.  The palace has been called “the real Downton Abbey” and you can see why. A monumental country home in the small village of Blenheim where people have been visiting since 1722. The architectural design is that of English Baroque and it was during World War I that the palace was turned into a hospital for any of the wounded soldiers. The palace and its estate is classed as a “true national treasure.” The name given to this outstanding building shows how special it is, after all not just any old place is given a name with “palace” incorporated. It is the only non-royal house in England with the title. During recent restoration works, something ancient was uncovered and no one can quite believe it. After all this time, it seems there were certain things about the palace that were not passed on to the next generation.

Country Estate

Nestled in Oxfordshire England, the stunning estate has been visited by people for decades. It was in October 2018, that restoration work began to take place, during which time, something unknown was discovered. When they unearthed this ancient old mystery, an astonishing story unfolded.

Country Estate

Surrounding the palace, the Grand Bridge has been graced with one of the most eloquent titles, “the finest view in England”. The order of the restoration works was requested to revive the area back to its former glory. The project was set to cost a staggering $15 million! But what was lurking underneath its foundations?

What Could It Be?

Of course, nothing but the best was needed for this breathtaking 18th-century structure. Unbeknownst to the workers and architect on site at the time, there was something lurking beneath the Grand Bridge, and it surprised more than just them.

What Could It Be?

Blenheim Palace was built in the early 18th Century to celebrate a magnificent victory over the French in the War of the Spanish Succession. It was specifically built as a gift to the 1st Duke of Marlborough, John Churchill. But what did he do to be awarded such a grand prize?

Battle Of Blenheim

John Churchill was the military commander who led the Allied forces in the Battle of Blenheim on 13th August 1704. Following the battle, Marlborough himself received the surrender from Marshal Tallard, leader of the French forces.

Battle Of Blenheim

To honor the Duke’s victories, Queen Anne rewarded him the ruined Royal Manor of Woodstock, along with £240,000 with which he could build a house to commemorate his achievements… And what a house he did build, that years later a secret would be revealed.